Britta boosted

‪I was tidying my room tonight, and this involved carefully hanging up all the belts and sashes and materials for my reasonably-historically-accurate pirate costume‬ based on takebackhalloween.org/anne-bon , and it made me happy. I’d been going to make a Brigid costume for Halloween this year, after having so much fun dressing as the Morrigan last year, but I’m totally just going to work more on my Mary Read.

Britta boosted

‪While reading the 1985 Quilt Digest with lunch, I encountered this beautiful step a quilter took to personalize her work. Besides putting initials on it, she stitched an outline of her hands. ‬

Remembered to take a new picture with my revised hair! Selfies from March 2018 and July 2019 in a favorite staircase at work.

Arachnids (tiny ones) 

This small blur was a small spider on the run to get under its succulent leaves with a tiny gnat prize!

Show thread

Arachnids (tiny ones) 

Today in my little container garden I watched a significant-sized spider eat a bee that it had caught! It dragged the bee deep under the succulent leaves for its crafty meal. It was great.

Show thread
Britta boosted

Q: HOW DO YOU CALCULATE THE AVERAGE FACTORY OUTPUT OF A LIST OF HOLY CITYS

A: MEAN THE SEES OF PRODUCTION

Arachnids (tiny ones) 

I am sometimes interpreting the success of my container garden by the size of the spiders making webs in it. So far they are mostly tiny, pin head size, but I saw a slightly bigger one today and it was good. I also see a couple of cocoons tucked into my ice plant leaves! Few bees though; most of my wildflower seed mix plants dried up before they flowered.

Britta boosted

@kioskwitch a father and son duo working in the late 1800s made hundreds of glass anatomical models of sea life and fruit and atoms, which were tossed out or left to languish in closets when sturdier plastic models became readily available. The Blaschkas were adamant that these were just everyday models and not very impressive but every single one looks like an art piece and they're gorgeous and accurate. Their techniques have been completely lost

Disaster preparation, blood donation, mass murder 

Also, I asked for the fingerstick to be on a specific part of my finger that would minimize it disrupting my harp practice, and I’m practicing my harp now and relieved that it doesn’t interfere at all. Just need to work out the brain thing.

Show thread

Disaster preparation, blood donation, mass murder 

I tried giving blood today, but I couldn’t because I felt lightheaded even just at the fingerstick for checking iron. It’s ok, and it was a nice way to observe the fifth anniversary of the Isla Vista incel murders with an effort at a gift, instead of thinking about them too much. But difficulty around medical stuff is a real weakness in my interest in supporting disaster response (both natural and human-made), and I hope to get better at this.

Happy to have made progress on repairing my duvet cover quilt my grandma made in the 70s with mostly vintage-at-the-time fabric. My mom and I talked to the fabric shop staff and learned the key is ironing fusible interfacing into it as reinforcement, *then* sewing in patches! My mom had a bit of 1949 interfacing that was fun, but this new interfacing product is amazing and soft and works well. Left it at my mom’s house to work on next time I visit; might write it as a blog post when I’m done?

This is the Eternal Bird Court poster that used to be abandoned in a corner of my office until I recently decided it was mine (by vickisawyer.com/).

Historical perspective on mass murder 

I lived in Isla Vista and still love it so much, this odd half square mile of utopian dreams and poor planning and lovely parks and loud parties every Thursday-Sunday. It still hurts, after five years of processing, to open things like nytimes.com/interactive/2019/0 and know where my Isla Vista is in the story of alt-right murder.

‪I started carrying a lightweight tape measure in my bag, and this has been useful over and over, so I share this with you as a thing you might find helpful too. It’s been especially good for checking surprise sidewalk finds and thrift store stuff for my house and garden.

Day off activities include bringing my old curtain to the fabric store for color/texture comparisons and my thrifted plant pots to the plant store for size/shape fitting. I have fully inherited the ways of my grandma.

Finished listening to The Dispossessed on my favorite hill, where I started listening to it six months ago, and...it wasn’t what I expected, but I’m glad I read it, and it convinced me to listen to more fiction! (selfie)

Show thread

Oakland’s Lake Merritt has a surprising number of shells and shell fragments on the sidewalks, probably dropped there by seagulls breaking them open to eat them. I picked one up and looked it up in this neat guide: inaturalist.org/guides/487 - it seems to be from a Japanese littleneck clam. I heard somebody say recently that identifying the name of a thing is a way of putting yourself in relationship to it, and that seems right to me for why it feels good.

Is there any reasonable self-hosted/non-Google way of making something like a Google My Map (annotated points on a map)? I’d be fine with software I need to run myself. Thinking about making a map of favorite places to recommend to people (and places I want to go but haven’t been to yet), and it seems more fun to do my own.

Climate change, disaster preparation 

I've been working on improving the weather-sealing around the drafty windows and doors in my home, because the rain and cold and smoke were getting in. I subscribed to my city's emergency alert text message service. I've started keeping a little more shelf-stable food. I took a CPR and first aid class. I'm just some random person and I'm adapting, and it's a creepy feeling.

Show thread
Show more
XOXO Zone

The social network of the future: No ads, no corporate surveillance, ethical design, and decentralization! Own your data with Mastodon!